To Avoid Colds, Get Enough Sleep

     Beginning in the eighties, sleep started getting a bad rap, as if it was something to avoid.  People didn’t want to miss out on anything.  The “anything” was likely to be work, as that decade saw the beginnings of the communication revolution in business and the impetus to “do it now”.  It started with pagers, evolved to fax machines and then cell phones.  By the mid-nineties, dial-up Internet came on the scene, and the pace of life has only sped up since then with the advent of smart phones.    

     Recently, researchers at the University of California, San Francisco conducted the first sleep study of its kind, using special technology to measure actual sleep time.  They established base lines for the study’s participants and then administered a cold virus.  Those with less than 6 hours sleep the week before were 4.2 times more likely to come down with a cold.

     While technology has certainly altered our lifestyles dramatically, our bodies haven’t changed in tens of thousands of years.  We need sleep.  It is not a luxury, but a necessity.  Sleeping less than 7 hours a night is associated with diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, stroke, weight gain, and depression.  It is also linked to weakened immune function, increased pain, more errors, and greater risk of accidents. 

    Along with good food and sufficient exercise, getting enough sleep is essential to good health.  It sounds easy enough, but I have many patients who have trouble sleeping.  Work schedules, family commitments, commuting time, certain illnesses or conditions, stress, emotional difficulties, all can contribute to insufficient sleep.  If this sounds like you, I invite you to call my office at 808-783-0361 and request a no-charge phone consultation.  There are many things I can do to help.  Find the article here.